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Is Netflix Expanding to Spain and the Far East?
A website claiming insider knowledge has published reports that Netflix is eyeing new territories.

Will Spain and some Asian countries be the next to get Netflix's streaming movie and TV service? That's the rumor put out by the website Screen Daily. In unconfirmed reports yesterday and today, the site said that Netflix would launch in Spain in January, 2012, and that it would be in "select Asian territories" by the end of that year.

As confirmation of Netflix's plans for Spain, Screen Daily spoke to Pedro Perez, president of FAPAE, a local producers association, who said that Netflix had already been in touch with several producers in his country.

In a separate report, Screen Daily alleged that Netflix would begin streaming in some Asian countries by the end of 2012. It didn't cite any sources in that story, however.

When reached for comment, Steve Swasey, vice president of corporate communications at Netflix, spoke of the company's already announced plans to enter Latin America.

"Everything else is speculative and we don't comment on speculation," Swasey continued.

In July, Netflix announced its plans to bring its instant streaming service to 43 countries in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. One week ago, competitor Hulu announced that it would expand to Japan later this year, which will be that company's first international expansion.

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