Streaming Media Magazine: Autumn 2011
Even the biggest, most industry-defining computing companies will turn against their ideas when there's a buck to be made. Just look at the Android operating system and Final Cut Pro X.
Whether it's in the classroom or not, video can play an important role for teachers, students and coaches, helping them build one-on-one connections.
While technology has brought changes across the United States, its power to connect is touching even those in less-developed nations.
What happens when a viewer is more interested in his or her smartphone screen while watching TV? The second screen becomes the primary screen.
With a focus on how-to for people who are using video but aren't online video experts, Online Video Strategies is one-of-a-kind
Hear leading content, consumer electronics, and standards experts discuss the challenges and opportunities involved with delivering online video to multiple devices in the home
Unlike other industry events covering the content delivery business, our Content Delivery Summit at Streaming Media Europe seeks to be a conversation that sparks innovation and cooperation across the industry
A look at the TVUPack, LiveU LU60, and AVIWEST IBIS DMNG, three products that offer cellular streaming from the field
What do major corporations think of online video? How do they rate its performance, and what more would they like to see it deliver? To find out, we spoke with employees from Ernst & Young, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, and Wells Fargo.
As movies move online and go mobile, sound gets some respect with updated codecs, more TLC, and a better attitude.
A comparison chart of three leading cellular multiplexers
Zeebox, the new venture from former YouView CTO Anthony Rose, promises to let viewers interact with television and other viewers via their tablets. Problem is, TV viewing is still fundamentally an asocial experience.
In which we follow the birth, life, and untimely death of a lone video packet trying to get from point A to point B
 

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