Upcoming Industry Conferences
Streaming Media West 2017 [2-3 November 2017]
Live Streaming Summit [2-3 November 2017]
Streaming Forum [27 February 2018]
Streaming Media East 2018 [8-9 May 2018]
Live Streaming Summit [8-9 May 2018]
Past Conferences

Viewers Will Stream 47 Minutes of Video Per Day in 2017: Zenith
Streaming time will shoot up this year, and a dramatic increase in mobile viewing is the reason why. Viewing time for non-mobile devices is flat.

Global viewers will average 47.4 minutes of online video viewing in 2017, forecasts media buying agency Zenith. That's up from 39.6 minutes the previous year. Nearly all of that increase will come from mobile devices, where online video viewing will grow 35 percent to 28.8 minutes per day. Looking ahead, it should grow another 25 percent in 2018 and 29 percent in 2019 thanks to an increased use of mobiles, better screens, and faster mobile connectivity.

Viewing time on non-mobile devices (including connected TVs, desktop computers, and laptops) will grow only 2 percent in 2017 to 18.6 minutes per day. Within that area, Zenith sees connected TV streaming time rising, while desktop and laptop viewing times are decreasing. Viewing times on non-mobile devices will actually shrink by 1 percent in 2018 and 2 percent in 2019.

This data comes from Zenith's Online Video Forecasts 2017, and includes all online video sources such as video sharing sites and subscription services. In 2019, mobile devices will make up 72 percent of all online video viewing, Zenith says, up from 61 percent in 2017.

All this video viewing will lead to an increase in advertising on streamed video. Zenith predicts the global online video ad market will reach $27.2 billion U.S. this year, an increase from 2016's $22.2 billion U.S. It should grow by 21 percent in 2018 and 17 percent in 2019, reaching $38.7 billion U.S.

Related Articles
Video advertising revenues are on the rise, along with AI, even as industry players argue over metrics. The current buzzwords are mobile, viewability, and programmatic.
Mobile video traffic keeps rising at a rapid rate, leaving operators struggling to keep up with demand. Meanwhile, the U.K. is falling behind on broadband connectivity.
People would stream a lot more video to mobile devices if not for restrictive data caps. But thanks to Netflix and Amazon, things are starting to change.