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Adobe and Juniper Offer Lessons on Scalable Video Delivery
Webinar highlights how customers are able to combine Adobe and Juniper to stream video at scale.

During a webinar hosted January 26th on StreamingMedia.com, executives from Adobe and Juniper Networks offered online viewers a quick tutorial to delivering live and on-demand events using their combined products.

The webinar kicked off with Kevin Towes, senior product manager at Adobe, who talked up the benefits of serving Flash video. Towes showed viewers how the smartphone market is growing and changing: by 2014 Android will be the dominant phone operating system, he said, and smartphones would make up 39 percent off all phones shipped. Consumers expect the same high-quality experience on their phones as they do on the home televisions or desktop computers, he said, a theme that would run through the rest of the webinar.

With the HTML5 video experience fragmented, Towes emphasized that the highly-pervasive Flash is the best solution for reaching viewers.

Towes' part of the webinar left off with the need for network and caching infrastructure to be increasingly aware of content, which provided a transition to Deepak Srinivasen, senior director of business development at Juniper. Srinivasen gave an overview of his company's Media Flow product family and told how Juniper has partnered with Adobe to offer high-level caching and delivery. He also told how a Flash Media Server instance can run on Media Flow to better scale delivery. The solution is carrier grade, he said, as well as network-aware and resilient.

Viewers can replay the archived Adobe and Juniper Networks webinar for the next 90 days.

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